Because the right of redemption is an equitable right, foreclosure is an action in equity. To keep the right of redemption, the debtor may be able to petition the court for an injunction. If repossession is imminent, the debtor must seek a temporary restraining order. However, the debtor may have to post a bond in the amount of the debt. This protects the creditor if the attempt to stop foreclosure is simply an attempt to escape the debt.

Usually a lender obtains a security interest from a borrower who mortgages or pledges an asset like a house to secure the loan. If the borrower defaults and the lender tries to repossess the property, courts of equity can grant the borrower the equitable right of redemption if the borrower repays the debt. While this equitable right exists, it is a cloud on title and the lender cannot be sure that they can repossess the property.[4] Therefore, through the process of foreclosure, the lender seeks to immediately terminate the equitable right of redemption and take both legal and equitable title to the property in fee simple.[5] Other lien holders can also foreclose the owner's right of redemption for other debts, such as for overdue taxes, unpaid contractors' bills or overdue homeowner association dues or assessments.
If you think this is just like renting, you are wrong. The problem with renting is you are paying a monthly fee without having anything to show for it after the fact. Imagine living in that place for years and years! You are potentially paying thousands of dollars for the years to come. With rent to own homes, your money goes towards ownership. Meaning, it is just like renting but working towards actually owning the property yourself instead of throwing your hard earned money down the drain.
You’ll pay rent throughout the lease term. The question is whether a portion of each payment is applied to the eventual purchase price. As an example, if you pay $1,200 in rent each month for three years, and 25% of that is credited toward the purchase, you’ll earn a $10,800 rent credit ($1,200 x 0.25 = $300; $300 x 36 months = $10,800). Typically, the rent is slightly higher than the going rate for the area to make up for the rent credit you receive. But be sure you know what you're getting for paying that premium.
Browse our extensive database of listings to find homes in your area. You can click on a listing to view more information about the listing as well as important neighborhood data, nearest schools and more. To access pricing information and to obtain the contact information of the owner, you can register for a trial membership. Our Trial Membership gives you access to many additional features, and we are always working on improving our listings data. You can cancel your membership at any time – simply contact us by email or phone for assistance, and we will be happy to help!
Committed to giving our clients great real estate options, we only hire highly knowledgeable and friendly realtors who are ready to discuss all the ins and outs of every property you are interested in. Our agents are licensed professionals who take the time to know you and recommend homes that fit your standards. Speaking of homes, we offer great deals to help you comfortably settle into a property you like.
A further rationale is that under the principle of freedom of contract, if debtors wish to enjoy the additional protection of the formalities of judicial foreclosure, it is their burden to find a lender willing to provide a loan secured by a traditional conventional mortgage instead of a deed of trust with a power of sale. Courts have also rejected as frivolous the argument that the mere legislative act of authorizing or regulating the nonjudicial foreclosure process thereby transforms the process itself into state action.[13]
Browse our extensive database of listings to find homes in your area. You can click on a listing to view more information about the listing as well as important neighborhood data, nearest schools and more. To access pricing information and to obtain the contact information of the owner, you can register for a trial membership. Our Trial Membership gives you access to many additional features, and we are always working on improving our listings data. You can cancel your membership at any time – simply contact us by email or phone for assistance, and we will be happy to help!
The homeowner either abandoned the home or voluntarily deeded the home to the bank. You will hear the term the bank taking the property back, but the bank never owned the property in the first place, so the bank can't take back something the bank did not own. The bank foreclosed on the mortgage or trust deed and seized the home. There is a difference.
If a property fails to sell at a foreclosure auction or if it otherwise never went through one, lenders — often banks — typically take ownership of the property and may add it to an accumulated portfolio of foreclosed properties, also called real-estate owned (REO). Foreclosed properties are typically easily accessible on banks' websites. Such properties can be attractive to real estate investors because in some cases, banks sell them at a discount to their market value, which of course, in turn negatively affects the lender. (See more on this here: Buying a Foreclosed Home).
The Great Nevada Beer Tradition. Folks have been brewing beer in Nevada since before it achieved statehood. There are many outstanding breweries here, including Big Dog's Brewing Company, Sun City Brewing Company, Silver Peak Brewery and the Virginia City Brewing Company. People in Nevada like their suds so much that every year they stage the Nevada Beer Weeks, an ongoing beer extravaganza that lasts from May 13th through June 1st. The states' micro-breweries show their wares and offer tastings that bring beer enthusiasts back every year.
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